Published News Neuroscience

Cannabis reverses aging processes in the brain

Memory performance decreases with increasing age. Cannabis can reverse these ageing processes in the brain. This was shown in mice by scientists at the University of Bonn with their colleagues at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel). Old animals were able to regress to the state of two-month-old mice with a prolonged low-dose treatment with a cannabis active ingredient. This opens up new options, for instance, when it comes to treating dementia. The results are now presented in the journal Nature Medicine.


Scientists might have just discovered a whole new role for the thalamus

The thalamus is a small region that sits in the centre of our brain, and is thought to relay signals from our ears, eyes, mouth and skin to other parts of the brain for processing.



But a new study suggests that it's not just passing on information - it also plays a role in cognitive behaviours, such as making decisions and staying focussed. 


The Future of Parkinson's Disease

I have spent much of the last eight months touring neurological facilities across North America and meeting with a number of leading researchers and physicians. There are quite a few new treatments in the pipeline or in early stages of research that have the potential to revolutionize how we deal with Parkinson’s disease.


Scientists have figured out how our brains sharpen our memories while we sleep

We all know that if we want what we've studied during the day to stick, it's best to get a good night's sleep. And while scientists have long understood that our memories rely on connections being built between neurons in our brains, it's not been clear how sleep actually helps to consolidate that information.



Now, two new studies have found biological evidence that expains the age-old wisdom that if we want to remember, we need to sleep to forget.


Alliance Mounts Comprehensive ALS Research Program | Science and Enterprise

A coalition of three medical centers in the U.S. is leading a comprehensive research initiative to find treatments and eventually cures for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. The collaboration, known as Answer ALS, plans to amass a coordinated knowledge base about ALS across a range of disciplines, and make their findings freely available to colleagues worldwide to speed development of therapies.

Neurons Constantly Rewrite Their DNA | Neuroscience News

Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that neurons are risk takers: They use minor “DNA surgeries” to toggle their activity levels all day, every day. Since these activity levels are important in learning, memory and brain disorders, the researchers think their finding will shed light on a range of important questions. A summary of the study will be published online in the journal Nature Neuroscience on April 27.

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