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Largest ever brain cancer study provides key insight into one of its deadliest forms

As far as cancers go, one of the worst is a type of brain cancer called glioma - the disease has a five-year survival rate of just 5 percent, and no reliable method for early detection.



A giant study that pooled genetic data from tens of thousands of people could change that, finding more than a dozen new mutations for physicians to hunt for in an effort to identify who is at risk of developing glioma.


Longer telomeres protect against diseases of aging: A tale of mice and men

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes discovered a key mechanism that protects mice from developing a human disease of aging, and begins to explain the wide spectrum of disease severity often seen in humans. Both aspects center on the critical role of telomeres, protective caps on the ends of chromosomes that erode with age.


Scientists turn mammalian cells into complex biocomputers | Science

Computer hardware is getting a softer side. A research team has come up with a way of genetically engineering the DNA of mammalian cells to carry out complex computations, in effect turning the cells into biocomputers. The group hasn’t put those modified cells to work in useful ways yet, but down the road researchers hope the new programming techniques will help improve everything from cancer therapy to on-demand tissues that can replace worn-out body parts.


Scientists discover mechanism that causes cancer cells to self-destruct

Many cancer patients struggle with the adverse effects of chemotherapy, still the most prescribed cancer treatment. For patients with pancreatic cancer and other aggressive cancers, the forecast is more grim: there is no known effective therapy.


It's happening: Scientists can now reverse DNA ageing in mice

Researchers have identified a cellular mechanism that allows them to reverse ageing in mouse DNA and protect it from future damage.



They've shown that by giving a particular compound to older mice, they can activate the DNA repair process and not only protect against future damage, but repair the existing effects of ageing. And they're ready to start testing in humans within six months.


Scientists have turned spinach into beating human heart tissue

Researchers have successfully used spinach leaves to build functioning human heart tissue, complete with veins that can transport blood.



To tackle a chronic shortage of donor organs, scientists have been working on growing various tissues and even whole organs in the lab. But culturing a bunch of cells is only part of the solution - they simply won't thrive...

Scientists have figured out how our brains sharpen our memories while we sleep

We all know that if we want what we've studied during the day to stick, it's best to get a good night's sleep. And while scientists have long understood that our memories rely on connections being built between neurons in our brains, it's not been clear how sleep actually helps to consolidate that information.



Now, two new studies have found biological evidence that expains the age-old wisdom that if we want to remember, we need to sleep to forget.


Tardigrades: The Micro World Meets the Macro World

Tardigrades are some of the most resilient creates on our planet. They are able to survive extreme situations by going into a sort of hibernation. These beings offer hope for finding life on other (more desolate) worlds in our solar system.


First human-pig 'chimera' created in milestone study | Science

Scientists have created a human-pig hybrid in a milestone study that raises the prospect of being able to grow human organs inside animals for use in transplants.



It marks the first time that embryos combining two large, distantly-related species have been produced. The creation of this so-called chimera – named after the cross-species beast of Greek mythology – has been hailed as a significant first step towards generating human hearts, livers and kidneys from scratch.


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