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Researchers identify the physical effects of stress and anxiety on cells

Researchers identify the physical effects of stress and anxiety on cells

As per new research, a combination of stress and anxiety might physically change the makeup of the mitochondrial cells. In our lifetime, we often deal with events that leave a lasting impression on our minds. Major incidents such as losing a loved one, war, divorce can lead to anxiety disorders along with panic attacks. Anxiety disorder is different from normal worrying since it is prolonged and does not reduce with time. It can be bad for our emotional and physical health since it interferes with the normal daily activities making them difficult to perform. 

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, anxiety disorders are impacted by a combination of our genes and the environment resulting in an overall stressful life. It has been observed that not all people facing traumatic events develop anxiety disorder raising the question of what makes some persons respond differently than others. 

To find the answer, scientists studied mice that had displayed symptoms of depression and anxiety such as staying alone after facing highly stressful situations. Changes in the genetic activity were then tracked along with the production of protein in the area of the brain which deals with stress and anxiety. These areas are the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. The research team used the “cross-species multi-omics” technique for analyzing the genes and proteins that are associated with mitochondrial cells. They found many changes in the mitochondria of the mice’s brain cells who were exposed to stress as compared to those who were not. After that blood samples of the patients who had panic disorder were tested and scientists detected similar mitochondrial changes in them.

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The researchers mentioned in PLOS Genetics that the studies revealed a regular convergence of differentially expressed pathways related to mitochondria in blood samples of patients dealing with a panic disorder after a panic attack. This method of cellular energy metabolism might be a way in which animals deal with stress. 

Mitochondria, also known as the powerhouse of cells turn the food consumed into 90 percent of the chemical energy needed for the functioning of the body along with destroying the rogue cells. Dealing with a high amount of stress can affect how the mitochondria function leading to complicated health symptoms. 

Iiris Hovatta, University of Helsinki said that right now there is very little information on the effects of chronic stress on cellular energy metabolism. So these underlying mechanisms might be essential to the prevention of diseases related to stress. Genetic studies of the persons suffering from anxiety might lead to informed treatment which is currently limited to psychotherapy and medicines. 

Journal Reference: PLOS Genetics

About the author: Kshitij Kumar Moderator
Kshitij has always been passionate about Science and Technology. He is a Mechanical Engineering graduate from IIT Jodhpur. Kshitij has worked in many fields of Science and Marketing. Along with managing backend and technicalities of the website, he is also one of our editors and marketing managers. Kshitij was the one who came up with the idea of connecting people interested in Science and built a team which is now ScienceHook.

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@peepso_user_409(Syed Safi)
who wouldve thought that anxiety could do that much
2 months ago