Login with your Social Account

Diamond graphite structure

Researchers demonstrate quantum teleportation within a diamond

Researchers from the Yokohama National University have been successful in teleporting quantum information securely within the boundaries of a diamond. The implications of this study are huge in the field of quantum information technology. It defines how sensitive information can be safely shared and stored. The results of the study have been published in the journal Communications Physics

Hideo Kosaka, professor at Yokohama National University, also a co-author of the study said that the phenomenon of quantum teleportation permits the transfer of quantum information into space which cannot be normally accessed. In addition to this, it also permits the information transfer into quantum memory by not revealing or destroying the stored information. 

In the case of a diamond, this inaccessible space consisted of its carbon atoms. Since a diamond is composed of well linked, self-contained carbon atoms it has the most suitable ingredients for quantum teleportation to occur. 

In the nucleus of the carbon atom, there are six protons and six neutrons. This nucleus is surrounded by six spinning electrons. In the bonding of atoms to form a diamond a very strong lattice is formed. Although diamond can also have complex defects. When a nitrogen atom is located in one of the two adjacent vacancies where there should be a carbon atom, the defect is called a nitrogen-vacancy-center. 

When surrounded by carbon atoms, the researchers call the nucleus of a nitrogen atom a nanomagnet

For manipulation of the electron and carbon isotope in the vacancy, researchers attached a wire of the dimensions of a quarter width of a human hair to the diamond’s surface. Then the team applied a radio wave and microwave to the wire for making an oscillating magnetic field around the diamond. The microwave was manipulated for generating the optimal conditions for the transfer of quantum information in the diamond. 

Then Kosaka’s team used nitrogen nanomagnet for anchoring an electron. They forced the electron spin for entangling with a carbon nuclear spin by using radio and microwaves. The break down of the electron spin occurs under the magnetic field which has been created by the nanomagnet, making it susceptible to entanglement. 

After the entanglement of the pieces which mean that the physical characteristics cannot be described individually as they are very similar, a photon holding the quantum information is applied and is absorbed by the electron. The absorption allows the polarization state of the photon to be transferred into the carbon, which is mediated by the entangled electron, demonstrating a teleportation of information at the quantum level.

This method can take chunks of information, from one node to another in the quantum field. Researchers want to develop this method further to enable large scale quantum computation and meteorology.