Login with your Social Account

HOW IT WORKS: The International Space Station

The International Space Station (ISS) is a space station in low Earth orbit. Its first component was launched in 1998, with the first long-term residents arriving in November 2000. It has been inhabited continuously since that date. The latest major pressurized module was fitted in 2011, with an experimental inflatable space habitat added in 2016. As of December 2018, the station is expected to operate until 2030. Development and assembly of the station continue, with several new elements scheduled for launch in 2020. The ISS is the largest human-made body in low Earth orbit and can often be seen with the naked eye from Earth.

The ISS consists of pressurised habitation modules, structural trusses, solar arrays, radiators, docking ports, experiment bays and robotic arms. ISS components have been launched by Russian Proton and Soyuz rockets and US Space Shuttles.

The ISS serves as a microgravity and space environment research laboratory in which crew members conduct experiments in biology, physics, astronomy, meteorology, human biology, and other fields. The station is suited for the testing of spacecraft systems and equipment required for missions to the Moon and Mars. The ISS maintains an orbit with an average altitude of 400 kilometres (250 mi) by means of reboost manoeuvres using the engines of the Zvezda module or visiting spacecraft. It circles the Earth in roughly 92 minutes and completes 15.5 orbits per day.

The above video showcases International Space Station from inside and tell how astronauts live there